Jacinta Dimase Literary Agent Melbourne

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New submssion guidelines for Young Adult and Middle Grade - Danielle Binks

July 20, 2016

I’m currently seeking authors of Young Adult (YA) and Middle Grade (MG) fiction works.

Before anyone submits they must of course be familiar with the MG and YA category, and especially aware that the MG readership means readers who are 8-12 while YA is anything from 15-years to (nowadays) early 20’s. 

I would hope that submitting MG authors in particular, would be familiar with the nuances and standards of the readership internationally. Aware of things like the Newbery Medal being the pre-eminent award for MG books in America, and at least some familiarity with bestselling books such as Rebecca Stead’s When You Reach Me and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder – not to mention popular MG authors such as Clare Vanderpool, Gary D. Schmidt, Rita Williams-Garcia, Tim Federle, Christopher Paul Curtis, Jacqueline Woodson, Katherine Rundell, C.J. Flood, and Kate DiCamillo.

More broadly – I am interested in contemporary and progressive MG and YA literature, subversive speculative-fiction for both readerships, and I have dreams of seeing the Australian children’s and YA graphic novel sector grow.

I’m also a supporter of the ‘We Need Diverse Books’ movement, and would love to elevate Own Voices – a term coined by American YA author Corinne Duyvis, to identify books about marginalised protagonists written by authors who share that same identity.

If you want even more of an idea of what I like to read and could possibly be looking for; I do have a background as a book blogger, so I’m quite literally an open book when it comes to celebrating and discussing my readings habits on my blog –  Alpha Reader  - and also through my opinion writing
But certainly some manuscripts I’d love to read would include;

·      A powerful verse-novel with strong point of view and story elements (think; Kwame Alexander, Sarah Crossan, Ellen Hopkins, and Steven Herrick).

·      An assured short-story collection, or a story told in vignettes (think; Margo Lanagan, Sandra Cisneros, Kelly Link and Karen Russell)

·      A graphic novel – in this I am open to anything for YA or MG readers (but in the past I have loved; Through the Woods by Emily Carroll, El Deafo by Cece Bell, Nimona by Noelle Stevenson, and This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki & Jillian Tamaki)

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Exciting changes at Jacinta di Mase Management - Danielle Binks joins as "Agent at Large"

June 21, 2016

Writer and reviewer Danielle Binks has joined Jacinta Dimase Management as “Agent at Large”. Danielle’s role within the literary agency will be to source and sign new clients for JDM, with a particular focus on children’s authors of Young Adult (YA) and Middle Grade (MG) fiction works.

JDM and Danielle have already signed their first author in Fiona Hardy, and her Middle Grade manuscript ‘Rosebud’ – which was shortlisted in the 2016 Text Prize. Hardy is a committee member of the Australian Crime Writers’ Association and is a bookseller at Readings. ‘Rosebud’ tells the story of an eleven-year-old girl who spends her school holidays making a horror movie with her friends. Text described the shortlisted manuscript as; ‘a sweet, funny, smart story for readers on the cusp of adolescence.’

Jacinta and Danielle are in love with ‘Rosebud’ and excited about the innovative “Agent at Large” role, helping to shape Australia’s vibrant youth literature scene. Danielle is particularly interested in contemporary and progressive MG and YA literature, subversive speculative-fiction for both readerships, and she has dreams of seeing the Australian children’s and YA graphic novel sector grow. Danielle is also a supporter of the ‘We Need Diverse Books’ movement, and would love to elevate “Own Voices” – a term coined by American YA author Corinne Duyvis, to identify books about marginalised protagonists written by authors who share that same identity.

Danielle studied writing and editing at RMIT and established her book review blog, Alpha Reader, in 2009. Her creative writing has been published in Voiceworks, and Yen magazine and she has been an online columnist for both Kill Your Darlings and the Stella Prize Schools Blog. Danielle is currently working as both editor and contributor to an anthology of short stories written by Australian YA authors, due to be released by Harper Collins in May 2017. She is also an elected member to the official LoveOzYA committee, and currently acting as interim chair. Her involvement with the grassroots “Read Local” initiative is what prompted Dimase to reach out and offer her a place with JDM literary agency; ‘It’s because of her commitment to finding and championing Australian talent that convinced me that I needed her by my side.’

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CBCA Shortlist announced: Congratulations to Phil Cummings, Clare Wright and Jane Jolly

May 27, 2016

The shortlists for this year’s Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Book of the Year Awards were announced at the CBCA Conference Sydney, 20 May 2016. This was perfect timing for the JDM team as we were able to share the news directly with visiting international children’s publishers during the – VIPS Program.
The shortlisted titles in each of the categories are:

Book of the Year: Older Readers

Cloudwish (Fiona Wood, Macmillan)
Freedom Ride (Sue Lawson, Black Dog Books)
Inbetween Days (Vikki Wakefield, Text)
The Flywheel (Erin Gough, Hardie Grant Egmont)
The Pause (John Larkin, Random House)
A Single Stone (Meg McKinlay, Walker Books)

Book of the Year: Younger Readers

Molly and Pim and the Millions of Stars (Martine Murray, Text)
Run, Pip, Run (J C Jones, A&U)
Shadows of the Master (Emily Rodda, Omnibus)
Sister Heart (Sally Morgan, Fremantle Press)
Soon (Morris Gleitzman, Viking)
The Cleo Stories: A Friend and a Pet (Libby Gleeson & Freya Blackwood, A&U)

Book of the Year: Early Childhood

Mr Huff (Anna Walker, Viking)
My Dog Bigsy (Alison Lester, Viking)
Ollie and the Wind (Ghosh Ronojoy, Random House)
Perfect (Danny Parker, illus by Freya Blackwood, Little Hare)
Piranhas Don’t Eat Bananas (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)
The Cow Tripped over the Moon (Tony Wilson, illus by Laura Wood, Scholastic)

Picture Book of the Year

And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda (Eric Bogle, illus by Bruce Whatley, A&U)
Flight (Nadia Wheatley, illus by Armin Greder, Windy Hollow)
My Dead Bunny (Sigi Cohen, illus by James Foley, Walker Books)
One Step at a Time by Jane Jolly, illus by Sally Heinrich, MidnightSun
Ride, Ricardo, Ride! by Phil Cummings, illus by Shane Devries, Omnibus
Suri’s Wall (Lucy Estela, illus by Matt Ottley, Viking)

Eve Pownall Award for Information Book

_Ancestry: Stories of Multicultural Anzacs_(Robyn Siers & Carlie Walker, Department of Veterans’ Affairs)
Lennie the Legend: Solo to Sydney by Pony (Stephanie Owen Reeder, NLA Publishing)
Phasmid: Saving the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect (Rohan Cleave, illus by Coral Tulloch, CSIRO Publishing)
_The Amazing True Story of How Babies Are Made (Fiona Katauskas, ABC Books)
The White Mouse: The Story of Nancy Wake (Peter Gouldthorpe, Omnibus)
We Are the Rebels: The Men and Women Who Made Eureka by Clare Wright, Text

The winners of this year’s awards will be announced on 19 August ahead of Children’s Book Week on 20-26 August.

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Congratulations to the CBCA notable award winners

April 19, 2016

Special congratulations to Clare Wright, Janeen Brian, Phil Cummings, Jane Jolly, and Elise Hurst for their books making the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Notable Books 2016 list. In total we have six titles on the Notable list, which is an incredible achievement by these creators.

The Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) has released its list of Notable Books for 2016.

Book of the Year: Older Readers
A Small Madness (Dianne Touchell, A&U)
Cloudwish (Fiona Wood, Pan Macmillan)
For the Forest of a Bird (Sue Saliba, Penguin)
Freedom Ride (Sue Lawson, Walker Books)
In the Skin of a Monster (Kathryn Barker, A&U)
Inbetween Days (Vikki Wakefield, Text)
Newt’s Emerald (Garth Nix, A&U)
One True Thing (Nicole Hayes, Woolshed Press)
Rich & Rare (ed by Paul Collins, Ford Street)
Talk under Water (Kathryn Lomer, UQP)
The Beauty is in the Walking (James Moloney, HarperCollins)
The Flywheel (Erin Gough, Hardie Grant Egmont)
The Guy, The Girl, The Artist and His Ex (Gabrielle Williams, A&U)
The Pause (John Larkin, Random House)
The River and the Book (Alison Croggon, Walker Books)
A Single Stone (Meg McKinlay, Walker Books)

Book of the Year: Younger Readers
300 Minutes of Danger (Heath Jack, Scholastic)
Bella and the Wandering House (Meg McKinlay, Fremantle Press)
Bridget: A New Australian (James Moloney, Omnibus)
Helix and the Arrival (Damean Posner, Random House)
Molly and Pim and the Millions of Stars (Martine Murray, Text)
Run, Pip, Run (J C Jones, A&U)
Shadows of the Master (Emily Rodda, Omnibus)
Sister Heart (Sally Morgan, Fremantle Press)
Soon (Morris Gleitzman, Viking)
The 65-Storey Treehouse (Andy Griffiths, illus by Terry Denton, Pan)
The Cleo Stories: A Friend and a Pet (Libby Gleeson & Freya Blackwood, A&U)
The Cut Out (Jack Heath, A&U)
The Fourteenth Summer of Angus Jack (Jen Storer, ABC Books)
The Hush Treasure Book (ed by Karen Tayleur, A&U)

Book of the Year: Early Childhood
Alfie’s Lost Sharkie (Anna Walker, Scholastic)
As Big As You (Sara Acton, Scholastic)
Bogtrotter (Margaret Wild, illus by Judith Rossell, Walker Books)
Frog Finds a Place (Sally Morgan & Ezekiel Kwaymullina, illus by Dub Leffler, Omnibus)
Hop Up! Wriggle Over! (Elizabeth Honey, A&U)
I Need a Hug (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)
I’m a Hungry Dinosaur (Janeen Brian, illus by Ann James, Viking)
Meep (Andy Geppert, Tiny Owl Workshop)
Mr Huff (Anna Walker, Viking)
My Dog Bigsy (Alison Lester, Viking)
Ollie and the Wind (Ghosh Ronojoy, Random House)
Perfect (Danny Parker, illus by Freya Blackwood, Little Hare)
Pig the Fibber (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)
Piranhas Don’t Eat Bananas (Aaron Blabey, Scholastic)
Puddles are for Jumping (Kylie Dunstan, Windy Hollow)
Small and Big (Karen Collum, Windy Hollow)
The Cow Tripped over the Moon (Tony Wilson, illus by Laura Wood, Scholastic)
The Very Noisy Bear (Nick Bland, Scholastic)
This and That (Mem Fox, illus by Judy Horacek, Scholastic)
This is a Ball (Beck Stanton & Matt Stanton, ABC Books)
Thunderstorm Dancing (Katrina Germein, illus by Judy Watson, A&U)
Too Busy Sleeping (Zanni Louise, illus by Anna Pignataro, Little Hare)
What Do You Wish For? (Jane Godwin, illus by Anna Walker, Viking)

Picture Book of the Year
Adelaide’s Secret World (Elise Hurst, A&U)
And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda (Eric Bogle, illus by Bruce Whatley, A&U)
Bob the Railway Dog (Corrine Fenton, illus by Andrew McLean, Walker Books)
Eye to Eye (Graeme Base, Viking)
Flight (Nadia Wheatley, illus by Armin Greder, Windy Hollow)
How the Sun got to Coco’s House (Bob Graham, Walker Books)
In the Evening (Edwina Wyatt, illus by Gaye Chapman, Little Hare)
Lara of Newtown (Chris McKimmie, A&U)
Mr Huff (Anna Walker, Viking)
My Dead Bunny (Sigi Cohen, illus by James Foley, Walker Books)
My Gallipoli (Ruth Starke, illus by Robert Hannaford, Working Title)
Numerical Street (Hilary Bell, illus by Antonia Pesenti, NewSouth)
One Step at a Time (Jane Jolly, illus by Sally Heinrich, MidnightSun)
Perfect (Danny Parker, illus by Freya Blackwood, Little Hare)
Platypus (Sue Whiting, illus by Mark Jackon, Walker Books)
Ride, Ricardo, Ride! (Phil Cummings, illus by Shane Devries, Omnibus)
Suri’s Wall (Lucy Estela, illus by Matt Ottley, Viking)
Teacup (Rebecca Young, illus by Matt Ottley, Scholastic)
The Eagle Inside (Jack Manning-Bancroft, illus by Bronwyn Bancroft, Little Hare)
What’s Up MuMu? (David Mackintosh, HarperCollins)
Where’s Jessie? (Brian Janeen, illus by Anne Spudvilas, NLA Publishing)
Why I Love Footy (Michael Wagner, illus by Tom Jellett, Viking)

Eva Pownall Award for Information Books
A is for Australia (Frané Lessac, Walker Books)
Alice’s Food A-Z (Alice Zaslavsky, illus by Kat Chadwick, Walker Books)
Ancestry: Stories of Multicultural Anzacs (Robyn Siers & Carlie Walker, Department of Veterans’ Affairs)
Anzac Sons: Five Brothers on the Western Front (Allison Marlow Patterson, Big Sky)
Atmospheric: The Burning Story of Climate Change(Carole Wilkinson, Black Dog)
Australian Kids through the Years (Tania McCartney, illus by Andrew Joyner, NLA Publishing)
Green Tree Frogs (Sandra Kendell, Windy Hollow)
Lennie the Legend: Solo to Sydney by Pony (Stephanie Owen Reeder, NLA Publishing)
My Gallipoli (Ruth Starke, illus by Robert Hannaford, Working Title)
Phasmid: Saving the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect(Rohan Cleave, illus by Coral Tulloch, CSIRO Publishing)
Prehistoric Marine Life in Australia’s Inland Sea (Danielle Clode, Museum Victoria)
The Amazing True Story of How Babies Are Made (Fiona Katauskas, ABC Books)
The Girl from the Great Sandy Desert (Jukuna Mona Chuguna & Pat Lowe, illus by Mervyn Street, Magabala Books)
The White Mouse: The Story of Nancy Wake (Peter Gouldthorpe, Omnibus)
We are the Rebels: The Men and Women who Made Eureka (Clare Wright, Text).

The Notable Books acts as the longlist for the CBCA Book of the Year Awards. The shortlist will be announced at the CBCA National Conference in Sydney on 20 May and the winners at an event in Sydney on 19 August. For more information about the CBCA Awards, click here .

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Sneak preview of the 'The Enchanted Island' Cover design

December 18, 2015

Sneak preview of Ellie O’Neill’s second book ‘The Enchanted Island’ out this Nov!

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Ruby Entertainment option dramatic film/TV rights in The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka

November 26, 2015

MEDIA RELEASE
Ruby Entertainment option dramatic film/TV rights in
The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka

Jacinta di Mase Management is pleased to announce that Ruby Entertainment has optioned the dramatic film and television rights for The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka by Stella Prize-winning historian Clare Wright.

Ruby Entertainment produced The Secret River as a two-part mini series based on the acclaimed novel by Kate Grenville, and won the 2015 Screen Producers Australia Award for Telemovie/Mini Series Production of the Year. The Secret River is nominated for 8 AACTA Awards.

“We are delighted to have won the rights for The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka and to be able to develop it for the screen. This is the perfect project to follow our mini-series, The Secret River and I am sure it will resonate profoundly with audiences here and round the world. This wonderful book is rich in stories that take audiences on an amazing journey with characters who were part of forming Australia as a nation, moulding the Australian character and shaping the new world. The experiences and perspectives of the women of this time were pivotal in making us what we are and their stories have never been properly told. Now is the time.” Ruby principals Stephen Luby and Mark Ruse.

The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is the most talked-about work of Australian history in recent years. Clare Wright’s groundbreaking, award-winning study was ten years in the research and writing. Irrepressibly bold, entertaining, and often irreverent in style, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is a fitting tribute to the unbiddable women of Ballarat—women who made Eureka a story for us all. The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize and the 2014 NIB Award for Literature, was a finalist for the Walkely Book Award and was shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s, WA Premier’s and Queensland Literary Awards, the NSW Premier’s History Awards, and the Victorian Community History Awards. The book has recently been published in a Young Adult edition as We Are The Rebels.

Dr Clare Wright is a historian who has worked as an academic, political speechwriter, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster.

Clare’s essays and journalism have been published in Griffith Review, Meanjin, Overland, The Age, The Guardian, The Conversation, Crikey and Women’s Agenda. She wrote and presented the ABC TV documentary Utopia Girls: How Women Won the Vote and created and co-wrote the ABC TV series The War That Changed Us, which was nominated for a Logie in 2015 for Most Outstanding Factual Program and an ATOM Award for Best Docudrama.

Clare is currently an Associate Professor in History at La Trobe University, where she holds an ARC Future Fellowship to research a new history of mining in Australia. Clare lives in Melbourne with her husband and three children.

Praise for The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka:

“I found The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka an astonishing book, not just for the until-now mostly unknown story it told, or the creative research techniques that unearthed such rewarding material but most of all for the rollicking tone of the book. Clare Wright has shown that history can be popular without sacrificing research standards but more than that she has shown us that the people of our past can come alive as real people in the hands of a skilled researcher and writer in ways that we have rarely seen before.” Anne Summers AO, journalist, editor, publisher, and author of Damned Whores and God’s Police and The Misogyny Factor.

“Clare Wright’s book Forgotten Rebels is one of those rare, penny-dropping, revelatory reads. She takes the Eureka story we’ve all heard and replaces the parts we never knew were missing. A vivacious, funny, tragic, page-turning, almost-beyond-belief tale. I love this book and I bloody well want to see the movie.”
Annabel Crabb, journalist, broadcaster, ABC chief online political writer, and author of The Wife Drought.

“This book will do for Eureka in the North American market what The Fatal Shore did for our convict period. The acclaimed US series Deadwood shows us how the nineteenth-century gold rush towns can be brought to life, with all their complexities of gender and class, theatre and entertainment, childbirth and sickness. Characters such as Calamity Jane, a woman dressed as a man, have their equivalents in the Ballarat of 20 years earlier as told here by Clare Wright.” Robert Pascoe Dean Laureate and Professor of History
Victoria University.

Forgotten Rebels is more than a history of women at Eureka; it is the best account we have of social life on the gold fields, men and women in families, at work and at play, in communal and political life.”
John Hirst, Emeritus Scholar at La Trobe University and Honorary Professor of History at Sydney University.

We Are The Rebels is … invaluable for the secondary school market.” Children’s Book Council of Australia

Literary agent Jacinta di Mase said, “Amid a wide field of interest in the dramatic rights to this book, Ruby Entertainment presented a compelling and ultimately convincing pitch for Clare Wright’s The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka. I was impressed by the optimism and creativity of the Ruby team and I’m looking forward to working with them to ensure the success of The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka on the screen.”

Clare Wright said, “I’m thrilled and humbled that a production company of Ruby’s calibre and accomplishments has shown such faith in my book. I’m excited to be working with Mark Ruse and Stephen Luby in developing a drama series that brings this key foundation story and the gold rush era to life in all its historically authentic, fascinating colour and rebellious intensity.”

For more information contact:
Jacinta di Mase Management
Tel: 0424505608
jacintadimase@ozemail.com.au

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Japanese edition of 'A Diplodocus Trampled My Teepee' (Saurus Street Book 6)

November 10, 2015

We were thrilled to receive Nick Falk’s Japanese edition of ‘A Diplodocus Trampled My Teepee’ in the post this week, originally published by Random House.

‘A Diplodocus Trampled My Teepee’ is book six of the Saurus Street series by author Nick Falk and illustrator Tony Flowers.

The Japanese edition was published by Kin-NoHoshi in September 2015.

Gorgeous illustrations! Congratulations Nick.

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Rosanne Hawke Wins the Nance Donkin Award presented by The Society of Women Writers.

August 28, 2015

Congratulations to Rosanne Hawke for winning the Nance Donkin Award presented by The Society of Women Writers (SWWV).

“The work of Rosanne Hawke changes readers’ world view” – Pam McIntyre.

The Nance Donkin Award is a biennial award for a woman author in Australia who writes for children. Nance’s intention in offering this award was to encourage and make known an excellent writer for children deserving more recognition.

Nance was a reader who held strong feminist and political views, and opened her mind to all current issues. She had a sharp spontaneous sense of humour. She is remembered by the Society of Women Writers Victoria for her long-time support as member and benefactor. The biennial Nance Donkin Award, a fitting memorial to Nance’s contribution to the children of Australia, was in planning before the time of her death in April 2008, was first presented in 2009, and, with the support of her family, will continue to validate the importance of writing for children, as Nance had wished.

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CONGRATULATIONS to Jane Jolly for winning an Honour Medal in the CBCA book awards for TEA AND SUGAR CHRISTMAS.

August 28, 2015

The manuscript had been on my list since 2005 and because I loved the story so much and thought it had commercial potential, I kept trying to place it over the years (after many rejections) until we finally sent it to Susan Hall at the National Library.

The reason I sent it to Susan was because she had approached Clare Wright to write for an illustrated history series that features photos, memorabilia, and ephemera from the NLA collection. Susan sent a copy of Michael Cathcart’s Starvation in a Land of Plenty (Will’s Diary of the fateful Burke & Wills expedition) as an example of the other books in the same series. As I flipped through Michael’s book, I wondered whether the NLA held any similar materials relating to the Tea and Sugar Train and whether Susan might be interested in publishing a book for children…

Here’s and extract from my original pitch to Susan in November 2012:

THE TRAIN ( slow mixed goods train NO. 5205)
…For 81 years, from 1915 to 1996, the “Tea and Sugar Train” travelled from Port Augusta to Kalgoorlie once a week, servicing all the settlements along the Nullarbor Plain, a 1050 mile long rail link.

It carried household goods, groceries, fruit and vegetables, a butcher’s van, banking facilities and at one time even had a theatrette car for showing films. In the late 1970’s medical services were included….

On the first Thursday of December every year, Santa would travel the line, distributing gifts to all the children on the way.

I’m sure that the NLA collection would include photographs and memorabilia relating to the train and I’m convinced that a book that combined NLA archival material with Jane Jolly’s whimsical story would be a hit with children, families, and teachers Australia-wide.”

I think I almost lost my mind when Susan said yes and that she had shown the manuscript to Robert Ingpen and that he had agreed to illustrate it. I could hardly contain myself when we all met in Melbourne to discuss the book’s format and to marvel over some of Robert’s rough sketches. When I asked Robert to sign our Ingpen illustrated classics: Wind in the Willows, The Jungle Book, and my favourite Alice in Wonderland he told me how he had used Keith Richards as inspiration for The Mad Hatter!

Since it was first published in November 2012 Tea and Sugar Christmas has been reprinted three times, won an ABIA for best picture book, and now the prestigious CBCA Book of the Year Awards Honour Medal (Eve Pownall Award), but best of all the wonderful story is being shared by children and their families across Australia.

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Netball Gems series launched in time for The Netball World Cup, Sydney

August 05, 2015

The Netball World Cup will be keeping Australians on the edge of their seats this August, and so will Random House’s new series ‘Netball Gems’ by B. Hellard and L. Gibbs.

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